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About country Gallery Where to stay

On the edge of the European Union lies small Estonia, known all over the world for its innovations, fast Internet, beautiful northern nature and the fairy-tale capital city Tallinn. The country is still reminiscent of Soviet times, however is rapidly changing.  If you plan to go, there are some facts that are worth knowing.

Even though Estonia is rather far from all the capitals of Western Europe, there are many ways to reach it, even by not flying: by ferry from Finland and Sweden, by bus from Poland, Germany and the other Baltic countries, and by train from Russia. And through Estonia itself you can travel by bike, car or public transport.

Even though Estonia is rather small, it is still bigger in area than Denmark or the Netherlands, but the country's inhabitants number just about 1.3 million. It might not come as a surprise, then, that about half of the territory is covered in forests, still inhabited by lynx, wolves, foxes, hares, deer and other mammals. Tourists have ample opportunities here to delve into the forest, sweat it out in a sauna or jump into a freshwater lake surrounded by pines.

The capital Tallinn is also famous in Europe for its Old Town surrounded by brick walls.  In the winter, the city looks straight out of a fairy tale, and, being by the Baltic Sea, Tallinn is a comfortable stop for those travelling by ferry or on a cruise. Every year, the capital hosts many festivals, markets, concerts and other festive events. Estonia is also famous for its national Song Festival, where every five years thousands of folk and pop singers come together.

It‘s hard to believe, but Estonia has around 2,000 islands in the Baltic Sea. It is true, however, that only a few of them are big and inhabited by people. The biggest island, Saaremaa, is famous for its nature, peace and quiet, lighthouses and slow-spinning wind mills. The hole island is like a open air museum of Estonian culture. Saaremaa‘s largest town is Kuressaare, which is home to a medieval castle, and is a great place to spend the day – which is why more and more tourists are coming to the town.

Estonians consider themselves as some of the least religious people in the world, with only one quarter of them seeing themselves as part of a religious group. Some could say that Estonia’s new religion is the Internet and new technologies – Estonians vote in national elections on the Internet, usually sign documents electronically, and in general, take advantage of any gadgets that make their lives a little easier.

Estonian culinary heritage, like that of many Northern and Eastern nations, consists of a lot of potatoes and pork. In the summer, you can try a wide range of food fresh from the garden, and in the winter, Estonians make use of their conserves. Tallinn is famous for its restaurants and cafés, so while you’re there, you certainly won’t miss out on delicious food.

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