Need hotel?
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Place of stay
Check in
Check out
Guests and rooms
Number of rooms
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Recommended hotels
Chapel 5 Palazzo Suites Malta
Chapel 5 Palazzo Suites Malta
GUEST HOUSE
TripAdvisor rating Based on 331 reviews
View more
Dar Guzeppa Farmhouse
Dar Guzeppa Farmhouse
VACATIONALS TURISTICS HOUSES
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1 reviews
View more
Pergola Farmhouses
Pergola Farmhouses
TripAdvisor rating Based on 90 reviews
View more
Victoria
Victoria
TripAdvisor rating Based on 2321 reviews
View more
Palazzo Prince D'Orange
Palazzo Prince D'Orange
BOUTIQUE
TripAdvisor rating Based on 110 reviews
View more
More hotels
About city Gallery Where to stay

Valletta, the capital of Malta, is a fortress city, founded in the 16th century by knights of the Order of St. John. During a two-year siege, these knights managed to free Malta from the Turkish yoke. The city had its beginnings with the building of a small commemorative chapel, which eventually became the marvellous Basilica of Our Lady of Mount Carmel.

In order to develop Valletta further, the city government later hired the famous European architect Francesco Laparelli, who first focused on turning Valletta into a defensive fortress. This lead to the city being built on top of a hill, which was surrounded by a mighty stone wall with guard towers. All of the defensive masonry, ramparts and arrow slits remain to this day and are popular with tourists, who are also drawn by the spectacular view that opens up from this stately wall.

By the way, since most of Valletta’s buildings that were erected during the first decade of city-building remain unaltered to this day, almost every house of the city can be called a historic monument. The streets of Malta’s capital are very narrow and designated mostly for pedestrians, and for that reason, we would advise against driving to the city in a rented car.

Valletta
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Valletta

In order to save space, all of Valletta’s houses were built along a strict line, and this is why the city has so little greenery. Sculptures (of which there are many) and the splendid building façades with colourful little balconies are the main ornaments of the city’s main streets.

Valletta can be easily navigated on foot, but if you plan to ride around the city’s charming little streets in a horse carriage, don’t forget to haggle. The capital of Malta can also be explored by tourist bus.

Valletta and Grand Harbour
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Valletta and Grand Harbour

Valletta is quite the museum city – every building here was part of some historic event or other. Furthermore, most residential house districts of the city are interspersed with ancient palaces and spectacular churches. Of Catholic churches alone Malta has 365, with the Co-Cathedral of St. John being the central one. This church, universally acclaimed as an architectural masterpiece, was built in 1573. Its museum displays many unique art works, one of which is the famous painting of M. Caravvagio, called The Beheading of St. John the Baptist, which is exhibited in the museum’s chapel. Four hundred knights of the Order of Malta are buried here. We recommend you also visit the 17th-century Church of St. Paul’s Shipwreck, the National Archaeology and Military museums, and enjoy the famous Barrakka Gardens.

Most travellers are surprised by the locals’ friendliness and hospitality. The inhabitants of Valletta are very keen on celebrations – during the period from May to September, almost every holiday is marked by some kind of carnival, solemn processions and performances. Some of the celebrations have deep historic roots, some are held to commemorate a particular saint, and some were born fairly recently. All of them, however, are certainly very festive.

Pedestrians at Valletta
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Pedestrians at Valletta

Arguably the best time to visit Valletta is on September 8 – the day of a regatta that takes place in the bay. This celebration is a tribute to an important historic event that took place on September 8 in 1565 – on that day, the city was successful at fighting back the Turks and defending its autonomy. Apart from the regatta, you can also see various music shows and visit fairs and exhibitions.

While in Valletta, don’t forget to try some local dishes, which are a mixture of European and Oriental cuisines. Fish and seafood are extremely popular here. We recommend you try some lampuka fish and stuffed octopus, both of which are great in Malta. Various rabbit stews and pasta variations, served with different sauces and vegetables, are considered to be the country’s traditional dishes. As for desert, we advise you go with halva and the famous pastizz pastries with a filling of figs, dates and almonds.

Tourists like to take back hand-made glass items, jewellery and various knick-knacks as souvenirs. Many of the artists that make these unique objects live in the suburbs of the city.

Where to stay

loading...