Need hotel?
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Place of stay
Check in
Check out
Guests and rooms
Number of rooms
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Recommended hotels
PURO Wrocław Stare Miasto
PURO Wrocław Stare Miasto
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1286 reviews
View more
Orbis Wroclaw
Orbis Wroclaw
TripAdvisor rating Based on 516 reviews
View more
Radisson Blu Hotel Wroclaw
Radisson Blu Hotel Wroclaw
TripAdvisor rating Based on 454 reviews
View more
Grape Hotel
Grape Hotel
TripAdvisor rating Based on 151 reviews
View more
The Granary la Suite Hotel Wroclaw
The Granary la Suite Hotel Wroclaw
TripAdvisor rating Based on 506 reviews
View more
More hotels
About city Gallery Where to stay

Wrocław, situated in Poland’s Lower Silesia province, is a city with a violent history. According to legend, it was established by the Czech Duke Vratislav, hence the name. The city celebrated its 1000th birthday in 2000. Before the Second World War, it belonged to Germany and was called Breslau. Poland annexed it after the war, when the Soviets began their march towards River Oder along the German-Polish border. The city was almost completely destroyed during the war, and was later diligently rebuilt.

Wrocław is located on the banks of River Oder. The river branches off into many separate forks and channels, which can be crossed via more than a hundred differently-sized bridges. Together with the exceptionally cosy local parks, they give the city unique charm.

Most tourists are especially impressed by the oldest part of the city – the Tume Island. As the sun begins to set, its narrow streets become illuminated by old-time gas lights, while the excellent lighting of public buildings makes the old town especially attractive for long walks. The Town Hall – a real gem of Gothic architecture – can be found in the Central Square, which is one of the largest squares in Europe. The dungeons of the Town Hall house the famous Swidnicka Cellar – one of the oldest European restaurants, where you can enjoy some brilliant Swidnicka beer.

Wroclaw - Poland's historic center, a city with ancient architecture
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Wroclaw - Poland's historic center, a city with ancient architecture

Every visitor of the city should see the famous Panorama racławicka – the artistic 120x15-metre canvas depicting the Battle of Racławice, during the Kościuszko Uprising. The battle took place on 4th April 1794, at Racławice, near Kraków. At first, this impressive panoramic painting, developed over nine months by Jan Styka and Wojciech Kossak, was displayed in Lwów, but after the losses suffered in World War II in the East, was eventually brought to Wrocław.

If you’re a lover of literature, we advise you visit the Museum of Pan Tadeusz. Yes, this museum is related to the work of Adam Mickiewicz and his famous poem Pan Tadeusz. Here you’ll find the manuscript of this poem, which set the city back 200,000 dollars. Also, be sure to visit the Hall of Napoleon, where you can find a painting which depicts the historic Battle of Eylau.

In 2016, this city of 50 churches will become the European Capital of Culture. The reason why we’ve mentioned churches is that in Wrocław they’re so impressive that failing to visit them would be simply unforgivable. Some of the most impressive one are: the 13th-century Cathedral of John the Baptist, which has the largest church organ in Poland; the St. Elisabeth’s Church with its 90-metre-high tower; and the St. Mary Magdalene Church with its astounding Witches’ Bridge that connects the towers.

Main Market Square
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Main Market Square

Wrocław is often visited by Germans interested in their nation’s historical and cultural monuments. Many of them find the Centennial Hall – a UNESCO-protected ferroconcrete structure, built in 1913 according to the designs of Max Berg – to be especially nostalgic. The German Kaiser himself took part in its unveiling. That same year Wrocław hosted an international exhibition, which had an impressive Japanese garden built in its honour in the Szczytnik Park. The garden, which met all of the gardening requirements of the time, became the main ornament of the exhibition. Even though, after the exhibition, most of the artefacts were taken away, the city government eventually decided to restore the garden. In 1996, several Japanese experts came and again turned the garden into a recreational centre for both tourists and the city residents.

The object that Wrocław prides itself on most is its university, built in 1702 on the initiative of Leopold of Habsburg. The university still has an authentic 18th-century concert hall, the Leopoldina. Its interior is luxurious, decorated with impressive frescoes, sculptures and gilding. The hall is now used for diploma ceremonies, conferences and other important events.

Sculpture of gnome
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Sculpture of gnome

The symbol of Wrocław – the famous dwarves – is another thing that every city guest notices. These underground creatures dwell all over the city and, according to some locals, help their city remain prosperous. The small mythical creatures can be found secured in concrete almost everywhere you go – some sit atop street lights, others lie bursting on rooftops of different pizza places, whereas others draw water from the river. Those interested in finding them all can go to tourist centres and get a special map with clues.

Where to stay

loading...