Need hotel?
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Place of stay
Check in
Check out
Guests and rooms
Number of rooms
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Recommended hotels
Dalyan Resort
Dalyan Resort
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1 reviews
View more
Sahin Palace
Sahin Palace
TripAdvisor rating Based on 623 reviews
View more
Aqua Hotel
Aqua Hotel
TripAdvisor rating Based on 3173 reviews
View more
Basar
Basar
TripAdvisor rating Based on 114 reviews
View more
Sedir Resort Hotel Rooms, Bungalows and Apartments
Sedir Resort Hotel Rooms, Bungalows and Apartments
BOUTIQUE
TripAdvisor rating Based on 224 reviews
View more

Top 5 Places in Marmaris

Pamukkale
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Pamukkale

Not long ago, Marmaris was a fairly obscure fishing settlement that was occasionally visited by Mediterranean cruise ships, however, once the attractiveness of both the city and the entire coastline was noticed, Marmaris soon became a prosperous resort. Now, thousands of European tourists spend their vacations on the city’s beaches. If you’re already packing for Marmaris, don’t forget to include these historical, architectural, religious and natural wonders into your itinerary.

1. Ephesus

Roman Library of Celsus in Ephesus (Efes)
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Roman Library of Celsus in Ephesus (Efes)

Ephesus is one of the most beautiful and best-preserved ancient Turkish cities, built in honour of the goddess Artemis. In Ephesus, the ancient world can be felt everywhere – in the streets, squares, temples, baths, houses of affluent locals, fountains and theatres. In terms of the number of parchment scrolls, the Library of Celsius almost matches the libraries of Alexandria and Pergamum. The building’s Classical two-storey façade remains to this day.

Amphitheater (Coliseum) in Ephesus (Efes) Turkey
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Amphitheater (Coliseum) in Ephesus (Efes) Turkey

The city’s history is inseparable from Christianity – the Virgin Mary spent the last several years of her life just 5 km from Ephesus. It is thought that Mary and St. John, to whom Jesus entrusted his mother’s guardianship before he was crucified, lived here from the year 42 to 48 CE, and in 1896, this fact was officially acknowledged by the Catholic Church. Now the place is marked by a chapel and St. John is buried close by. In 6th century CE, the emperor of Byzantium – Justinian – ordered a basilica to be built on his grave.

2. Dalyan

Dalyan rock tombs
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Dalyan rock tombs

Today’s Dalyan is situated on the right bank of the River Dalyan, while the old Caunos (Kaunos) is located on the Western bank. Sailing along the valley of river, one can enjoy some fascinating panoramas of the delta, artful crypts of the old Lycian rulers carved in the coastal cliffs, and see the remains of the old Caunos, bursting with ancient myths and legends.

Touristic boat trips in the river between Koycegiz Lake and Iztuzu Beach in Dalyan
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Touristic boat trips in the river between Koycegiz Lake and Iztuzu Beach in Dalyan

These places are well-known for the healing powers of their sulphur-rich waters and mud baths. If you go to the natural reservation’s beach, you can see some of the famous sea turtles that come here from as far as South Africa. The white sandy beach and the combination of fresh river delta and salty sea waters create excellent conditions for these turtles to build their nests.

3. The Temple of Artemis

Temple of Artemis ruins
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Temple of Artemis ruins

Ephesus used to be home to the second Wonder of the World – the Temple of Artemis. People used to be astounded by its sheer size alone – it was the biggest structure in the whole of ancient Greece, and the most beautiful building in Ephesus. The temple used to be surrounded by 127 18-metre-high pillars, arranged in four rows, and built so densely that they resembled a forest. The bottom of each pillar, which support the temple’s roof, was decorated with etched and colourfully painted figures. Its centre used to have a 15-metre-high statue of Artemis, which was made from gold and ivory, and once illuminated by flaming torches. The façade of the temple was adorned with an image of the legendary monster Medusa.

Miniaturk park in Istanbul
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Miniaturk park in Istanbul

In  the year 262, Goths attacked Ephesus and demolished the temple, and in the 5th century, it was completely destroyed by Christians. Today, what’s left of it is just a few individual parts of the pillars and one full pillar that was assembled from separate pieces in 1972. The twelve remaining pillars are kept in Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, while the altar and some valuable sculptures can be found in the British Museum in London.

4. The Island of Cleopatra

Cleopatra island
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Cleopatra island

This is a picturesque Aegean island, known for its beach and crystal-clear waters. People say that Cleopatra used to bathe here over 2,000 years ago. The island’s white sand is used as medicine to treat various burns, and according to legend, it was brought here from Egypt at the order of Marcus Antonius. For a long time, this story was thought to be pure legend, but 15 years ago it was discovered that the kind of sand found on the island exists only in North Africa.

5. Pamukkale

Pamukale
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Pamukale

Pamukkale is one of the most surprising places in Turkey. It’s a stalagmite canyon, covered in a white mineral layer, and its terraces are brimming with streams of cold and hot water. Legend has it that bathing in these waters makes one younger. Even though it’s clearly just a legend, these waters have a positive effect on people’s skin and entire organism. Not far from this natural wonder you’ll also see the ruins of the ancient city Hierapolis (founded in 2nd century BCE), a theatre, the country’s largest necropolis, Roman baths, an ancient main street, and a Temple of Apollo.

Write comment