Need hotel?
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Place of stay
Check in
Check out
Guests and rooms
Number of rooms
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Recommended hotels
H15 Boutique
H15 Boutique
TripAdvisor rating Based on 924 reviews
View more
Regent Warsaw Hotel
Regent Warsaw Hotel
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1516 reviews
View more
DoubleTree by Hilton Warsaw
DoubleTree by Hilton Warsaw
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1090 reviews
View more
Mamaison Hotel Le Regina Warsaw
Mamaison Hotel Le Regina Warsaw
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1478 reviews
View more
Holiday Inn Warsaw Jozefow
Holiday Inn Warsaw Jozefow
TripAdvisor rating Based on 317 reviews
View more
More hotels
About city What to see Gallery Where to stay

Warsaw is somewhat like the Phoenix - it always rises from the ashes. In 1596 Warsaw became the capital of Poland. Today, it is the biggest city in the country, home to 1.7 million people, and is situated by the Vistula River.

During World War II, the city was almost completely destroyed. Later, it was rebuilt and declared a UNESCO heritage site as an exemplary case of scientific restoration.

Color houses on Castle square in Warsaw, capital of Poland
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Color houses on Castle square in Warsaw, capital of Poland

Warsaw is the political, economic and cultural center of the country, and the main government agencies are located here. That’s why it’s interesting to see not only Warsaw’s historical landmarks, but also the new look of the city, which came into being during only the last several years.

Even though the people of Eastern Europe rarely see Warsaw as “foreign”, there are many reasons to visit it. Warsaw is a beautiful, modern, thriving, and rapidly changing city. It has many parks and restored historical monuments and landmark sites.

An aerial view of Warsaw, Poland from a helicopter
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  An aerial view of Warsaw, Poland from a helicopter

The most famous symbol of Warsaw’s great historical past is The Royal Castle (Zamek Królewski). It was all but devastated during World War II, later to be rebuilt and turned into a museum. Near the castle you’ll find Warsaw’s Old Town, known for its beautiful, colourful buildings and narrow streets, which were built here during the Middle Ages.

At the center of The Old Town is The Market Place (Rynek Starego Miasta). It was the center of Warsaw’s public life until the 19th century. Most of the colorful buildings here were built by wealthy city merchants.

Video
Video by F-Stop Productions.  

One of the most picturesque historical streets of Warsaw is The Royal Route (Trakt Królewski), stretching from Castle Square to Wilanów Palace. Here you’ll find several small restaurants, museums, galleries, and painters exhibiting their work right on the street.

While in Warsaw, you can also visit The Łazienki Park, which is home to the so-called Palace on the Water – a masterpiece of Neoclassical architecture.

In the city center you’ll find another “palace” – The Palace of Culture and Science. This spectacular mid-twentieth century building is the legacy of the Soviet Union.

We also recommend you visit The National Museum, The Polish National Opera, the Jewish ghetto and the nearby Żelazowa Wola village, where the famous Polish pianist and composer Frédéric Chopin was born and raised.

The architectural celebrity of modern-day Warsaw is The Millenium Clock, which was built on top of The Royal Castle at the beginning of this century. According to The Guinness Book of World Records, it is the highest mounted town clock (165 meters) in the world.

Some advice for your trip: The locals advise tourists not to exchange money at the currency exchange in the city center (the rates there are usually very unfavorable for the buyer); taxis are about 30% cheaper if called via phone than hailed on the street. Besides, the Warsaw public transport system is very efficient.

The Old Town in the City of Warsaw
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  The Old Town in the City of Warsaw

The Poles also warn tourists about buying antiques, because the law prohibits taking them out of the country. This category includes paintings that were made before 1945.

Where to stay

loading...