Need hotel?
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Place of stay
Check in
Check out
Guests and rooms
Number of rooms
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Recommended hotels
Belgrade Boutique Hotel
Belgrade Boutique Hotel
TripAdvisor rating Based on 29 reviews
View more
Hotel Mint
Hotel Mint
TripAdvisor rating Based on 383 reviews
View more
Apartments Belgrade Center  Resavska
Apartments Belgrade Center Resavska
TripAdvisor rating Based on 29 reviews
View more
Square Nine Hotel Belgrade
Square Nine Hotel Belgrade
TripAdvisor rating Based on 425 reviews
View more
Hyatt Regency Belgrade
Hyatt Regency Belgrade
TripAdvisor rating Based on 799 reviews
View more
More hotels
About city Gallery Where to stay

Belgrade, the capital of Serbia, is located in the central part of the country, at the confluence of the rivers Sava and Danube. Home to 1.2 million people, Belgrade is traversed by the boundary of the Balkan Peninsula and Central Europe. The city is characterised by a hilly landscape.

The Serbian capital has a stormy history: it has been conquered by 40 different armies at various points in time, and rebuilt anew 38 times. Belgrade’s ancient walls have seen the Celts and the Romans, the Goths and the Franks, and the Austrians and the Germans.

The city’s main historic architectural celebrities are considered to be those erected after the establishment of the Serbian state. These structures, which are not that old, by the way, are the four royal palaces that have reached us from the times of the Obrenović and Karađorđević dynasties, and the parliament building. Another celebrity of Belgrade is the famous House of Flowers, where the ex-Yugoslavian post-war leader Josip Broz Tito was buried.

Tourists stroll in Belgrade
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Tourists stroll in Belgrade

And yet, for their first stop, most tourists choose the Fortress of Kalemegdan, situated on a rather high hill. Here you’ll find a war museum, which displays a number of unique armaments made during different historic epochs by different nations. To reach this military citadel, you’ll have to pass through 12 gates, connected by wooden bridges over defensive trenches. The fortress is surrounded by the Kalemegdan Park, which is perfect for a walk on a hot summer’s day. Here you can also see an excellent panorama of the confluence of the Sava and Danube.

Arguably, the best place to experience the spirit of Belgrade is the historical neighbourhood of Zemun, located on the right brink of the Danube. The neighbourhood is dominated by narrow, winding medieval streets with ancient houses and villas on each side, and little churches buried in their depths.

Knez Mihailova Street
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Knez Mihailova Street

The 36-metre-high Milleniumo Tower, located on the Gardoš Hill, was built in 1896, and the uppermost point of the hill opens up on an excellent view of the city and the two rivers. This is also the place where tourists can find the highest concentration of inns, including the many little “floating” restaurants, moored on the waterfront.

Belgrade’s most colourful neighbourhood – Skadarlija – is a pedestrian district and a true mecca of bohemian artists, youths and tourists. The streets here are always alive with music, and the walls are decorated in colourful flowers and artistic graffiti. The place is brimming with restaurants, traditional Bulgarian taverns, night clubs and souvenir shops. Skadarlija has many cobblestone-covered streets and inns with romantic names: Three Hats, Those were the Days…, Two White Doves, Two Deer, etc.

Ada bridge on river Sava, Belgrade
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Ada bridge on river Sava, Belgrade

The centre of Belgrade is chaotically crammed with buildings from different historical eras. Ancient houses are interspersed with precast Soviet-style structures from the communist era. The city squares are full of contemporary art installations made from scrap-iron. Several of the central streets are closed off and turned into pedestrian zones.

Upon arrival, two things immediately stand out: the high ratio of retro cars and a similarly high count of dog lovers. In Belgrade, these four-legged pets walk alongside their masters unleashed, swim in fountains, and lie under the table in cafés while their owners drink coffee…

Now, the streets of Belgrade are quiet and peaceful – it’s hard to imagine it being bombarded during the Balkan conflict as recently as 1999. The bombed building of the Ministry of Defence can still be seen at the centre of the city – it was left there as a ghastly monument to the recent past.

Where to stay

loading...