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Where to Ski: Italy‘s Top 5 Ski Resorts

Madonna di Campiglio
Photo taken by Travel On Spot.  Madonna di Campiglio

Italy is one of the countries with the most ski resorts in the world. Its mountains are home to 286 ski resorts, over 6,000 km’s worth of tracks in the Alps, located around 3,900 m above sea level, and 1,837 lifts of different types. Rest assured, you’ll have plenty of options to choose from once you’re here. To make it easier for you, Travel on Spot presents you with several of the best options not just in Italy, but in all of Europe. A six day pass in most of the resorts mentioned on the list will set you back 200 to 250 EUR.

1. Madonna di Campiglio

Madonna di Campiglio
Photo taken by Travel On Spot.  Madonna di Campiglio

Without a doubt, this is one of the best and most stylish ski regions in both Italy and the entire continent. This resort complex, located in the Dolomites, spans over 150 km of different ski tracks built at an elevation of at least 2,600 m. The resort’s centre is Val Rendena, a cosy little town surrounded by a plethora of mountain peaks.

Madonna di Campiglio is connected with the Val di Sole ski region. The latter is another resort offering tracks to match anyone’s skill level, including the most seasoned of skiers. Here you can find everything a winter sports enthusiast could possibly desire, and that makes travelling to this Alpine region more than worth it.

Madonna di Campiglio
Photo taken by Travel On Spot.  Madonna di Campiglio

Val Rendena is mostly focused on beginner skiers and snowboarders, who can practice on tracks and ramps built specifically for them. Meanwhile, experienced skiers can try out the most difficult tracks, and then head down to meet the rest in Val Rendena’s bars and dance floors.

2. Livigno

Snow park in Livignio
Photo taken by Travel On Spot.  Snow park in Livignio

The town of Livigno is situated in a 25 km valley in Northern Alps. This resort, subject to Lombardy’s province Sondrio, is among the hardest-to-reach in the world. Livigno is sometimes called Little Tibet.

It’s also one of the cheapest resorts in the Alps. On the other hand, the views, the service and the ski tracks are all of the highest quality. As Italians themselves like to say, Livigno is a small, yet magical town, where every house is built from wood and stone.

Livignio
Photo taken by Travel On Spot.  Livignio

November to April, Livigno is covered in dry and fluffy snow. The town has several sports schools, led by experienced instructors. This is where beginners take their first steps on skis.

In total, the resort has 30 lifts and 115 km’s worth of ski tracks. Half of them are marked as red, a fifth as black, and the rest are designed for beginners.

There’s plenty to do here even after dark – Livigno has a number of restaurants, cafés, bars and discos. Tourists also like to visit the tax-free commerce zone: the village is home to over 200 tax-free shops.

Huskie trips in Livignio
Photo taken by Travel On Spot.  Huskie trips in Livignio

There are also buses that go from Livigno to the ancient Roman town Bormio. There you’ll find an excellent thermal bath complex Bagni Vecci, which was visited in 1493 by Leonardo da Vinci himself.

3. Cervinia

Cervinia
Photo taken by Travel On Spot.  Cervinia

This resort, located high up in the mountains, has some of the longest tracks in Italy. Furthermore, the snow here is dry and excellent December to April. Cervinia has about 160 km’s worth of tracks, although the region shares its lifts with the Zermatt ski tracks of Switzerland. This means that an international ski pass will allow you to enjoy as many as 360 km’s worth of excellent tracks.

Cervinia
Photo taken by Travel On Spot.  Cervinia

It may not be the most beautiful and stylish resort in Italy, but its tracks are simply perfect for any winter sports enthusiast. In this resort, both beginner and advanced skiers can certainly gain plenty of self-confidence for future trips to the mountains.

For instance, the 8 km-long Ventina track, marked red, is fairly difficult for pretty much any skier, turning even the strongest of legs into Italian pasta once the session is over.

4. Cortina d’Ampezzo

Cortina d'Ampezzo
Photo taken by Travel On Spot.  Cortina d'Ampezzo

This is one of Italy’s most charming and romantic Dolomite resorts – not just because of the beautiful cliffs, soaring above the village, but also for its interesting history, heritage and natural cosiness. During the ages, this place belonged not only to Austria, but also to the U.S., which occupied it during the Second World War. Cortina d’Ampezzo used to be the most famous ski resort in all of Italy, but during recent years, investments into its lifts and tracks diminished quite significantly. For this reason, the resort is now frequented mostly by locals seeking a resort that’s quiet and well-maintained, if not equipped with the most modern of facilities.

Cortina d’Ampezzo has around 115 km’s worth of tracks, best suited for advanced and highly skilled skiers. There’s also a decent number of tracks marked black. This resort is part of the common Dolomite resort system. All of the region’s resorts can be accessed by purchasing the Superski Pass.

Other than ski tracks, the town also has many luxurious shops and inns. This is why it’s not even clear whether tourists are more attracted by the mountains and winter sports or the opportunity to go shopping in a luxurious resort.

5. Madesimo

Madesimo Landscape
Photo taken by Travel On Spot.  Madesimo Landscape

Madesimo is, without a doubt, the best choice for those on a tight budget. A six day ski pass costs around 176 Euros here, and the town itself is located near the Lake Como. A flight from Milano to Madesimo takes around 2.5 hours. The opportunity to ski on excellent quality tracks for a reasonable price makes this resort one of the most popular holiday destinations with Italian families. Madesimo has 12 lifts and 60 km’s worth of various tracks.

Even though most of the resort’s tracks are designed for intermediate skiers, winter sports experts will still have plenty to do here as well. Although the total area of Madesimo is not particularly large, it does have quite a few interesting tracks. The only disadvantage of the resort is that in winter it gets really overcrowded on weekends. If you come here on a weekday, however, you’ll be able to enjoy your skiing without bumping into too many people.

Madesimo is also known for its restaurants, pizzerias and bars. The prices here are quite a bit lower than in, say, French ski resorts.

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