Need hotel?
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Place of stay
Check in
Check out
Guests and rooms
Number of rooms
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Recommended hotels
Hoopoe Villas Lanzarote
Hoopoe Villas Lanzarote
VILLA
TripAdvisor rating Based on 131 reviews
View more
Villas Salinas de Matagorda
Villas Salinas de Matagorda
VILLA
TripAdvisor rating Based on 86 reviews
View more
Arrecife Gran Hotel & Spa
Arrecife Gran Hotel & Spa
TripAdvisor rating Based on 2525 reviews
View more
Nautilus Lanzarote
Nautilus Lanzarote
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1011 reviews
View more
Villas Vista Bonita
Villas Vista Bonita
VILLA
TripAdvisor rating Based on 3 reviews
View more

Lanzarote: The Island’s Top 3 Must-Visit Places

Lanzarote geysers
Photo taken by Pavlo Hryhorash | flickr.  Lanzarote geysers

Everything on Lanzarote has a connection with volcanoes, lava and the heritage of the great architect César Manrique. Born in the island’s capital Arrecife, this architect managed to combine the beauty of nature and volcanoes with architecture. His works are visited by many people from all around the world. Go and take a look yourself!

The Fire Mountains of Timanfaya (Montañas del Fuego)

Lanzarote, volcanos
Photo taken by Jo Beverley | flickr.  Lanzarote, volcanos

After volcano eruptions that lasted for six years and a final blow in 1824, the north-western part of the island became an unrecognizable place, flooded with lava. The Timanfaya National Park, also known as the Fire Mountains, was established in order to preserve its post-eruption state. It’s the most visited site of Lanzarote, attracting around a million people every year.

Charco de Los Clicos, El Golfo, Lanzarote
Photo taken by GanMed64 | flickr.  Charco de Los Clicos, El Golfo, Lanzarote

You can explore Timanfaya by the park’s bus, as it is forbidden to enter on foot or by car. And not without reason – the earth heats up to 600°C at the depth of 13 metres. The road between the rock formations, – which sometimes reach several metres – was designed by César Manrique.

The surface here reminds of a lunar landscape. It’s a colourful and vast lava-covered desert. An estimated 30 volcanoes are on the territory of the park. At the end of the road, on the highest point of the island, stands the El Diablo restaurant, which uses the heat from the ground to cook food. National park staff members show what kind of heat is beneath your feet. Water poured into a dug-in pipe turns to vapour, and dry grass thrown into a small hole catches fire. Camel rides are also offered in the park. In 1993 the the Timanfaya National Park was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Jameos del Agua – A Restaurant in a Lava Cave

Lanzarote,Jameos del Agua Pool
Photo taken by Peter Gerstbach wikimedia.org.  Lanzarote,Jameos del Agua Pool

In the 60s, César Manrique decided to create a unique tourist attraction centre. Next to a lava cave (Jameo Chico) in the northeast of the island he built stairs going down, and in a cave surrounding a small natural lake he created an impressive bar and restaurant, which is sometimes even called the most beautiful night club in the world. The restaurant offers its visitors not only the opportunity to sit down for a spell, but also to spend the night dancing to Spanish music. Truth be told, however, it’s not the cheapest establishment on the island.

The water in the lake and surrounding bodies of water is clear, and you can see blind albino crabs which have become the symbols of Jameos del Agua. Close to this cave-restaurant the architect built a modern villa with a very cosy garden.

Jameos del Agua is situated close to Los Verdes – one of the longest and most impressive caves in the world – formed an estimated 4,000 years ago during a volcanic eruption. The underground tunnel is 6 kilometres long. For centuries, the islanders used such tunnels as shelter against raging pirates. In 1964, it was opened to tourists. Visitors can explore this wonder of nature with the help of a guide.

The Cactus Garden

Park in Lanzarote
Photo taken by Gernot Keller - wikimedia.org.  Park in Lanzarote

The Cactus Garden (Jardin de Cactus) is a perfect example of architecture blending in with the environment. The garden designed by César Manrique, who left his trace in other parts of the island as well, intrigues visitors with its ingenuity – the paths are winding down to the centre of the garden in serpentine-like fashion. It resembles the many craters found on the island.

On the 5,000 m2 of territory, more than 7,200 cactuses of 1,100 genera from various remote places in Peru, Mexico, Chile, USA, Kenya, Tanzania, Madagascar, Morocco and, of course, the Canary Islands, grow. The spiny and spineless cactuses come in all shapes and sizes.

Close to the park is a beautiful mill still grinding gofio – barley and maize flour – the main staple food of the indigenous Guanches. The Cactus Garden was established in the town of Guatiza, in the municipality of Teguise, where the land is suitable for large cactus plantations.

Write comment