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About city What to see Gallery Where to stay

Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic, is a nice place to visit with comfortable footwear and a loved one by your side. It’s much more fun to navigate the narrow cobbled streets together, and walking in ill-fitting shoes is no fun at all. Solving the footwear problem is easy enough, but if you don’t have a loved one, don’t despair either – just touch the sculpture of St. John of Nepomuk, located on the Gothic Charles Bridge, and on the next visit you’ll be accompanied by the love of your life.

Prague is simply bursting with fascinating things. Case in point, the miniature Eiffel Tower, situated on the Petřín Hill – however many metres the tower is shorter than the original are supplied by the height of the hill itself. Or the famous clock – wedged in a crowd of curious tourists, gathered on the Old Town square, one stands and waits for the moment when the little stained glass windows open up and let the apostles show up on the clock-face, which hangs on the city hall’s façade. And the hands of the old clock, located in the Pink House of Jewish Quarter, always move backwards.

Prague at night is a magnificent city
Photo taken by Zlobr 007 - wikimedia.org.  Prague at night is a magnificent city

All of these curious objects are very tightly packed. Prague is not so much a city as a mystery box, chock full of surprises. Visiting the city will probably make you want to see Paris, too. If that’s the case, we recommend you make your way to the Malá Strana District in general and Nerudova Street in particular. Those who had been to Montmartre are sure to be shocked to discover how similar they are. Want to visit Vienna? Simple – the Neo-Renaissance Prague Opera House or the National Museum, combined with excellent pastries in cosy cafés, will remind you of the Austrian capital. And walking along the coastline of the River Vltava, many tourists can’t believe they’re not in Geneva.

All of Europe has walked on Prague’s cobbled streets: Austrians, Swedes, Prussians, the French and Bavarians had all left their individual ethnographic imprints in the layered cake that is this city.

We recommend you get the Travel Guide to Prague and head out on a journey through the city’s ancient streets. Since Prague is not an especially big city, all of its famous objects – Prague Castle, Charles Bridge, Wenceslas Square, Old Town Square and the Town Hall with its ancient chimes – are located close to each other. Also, don’t forget the famous Jewish Quarter and its synagogues and Jewish cemeteries.

Traditional Czech beef goulash
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Traditional Czech beef goulash

Everyone knows the Czech Republic is famous for its beer, so don’t miss the opportunity to have a glass in the U Čaši Pub which the Good Soldier Švejk himself used to frequent. After that, it would be quite appropriate to go to the bar U Švejků where you can get a huge portion of pork shank, cooked with spices, and try 116 different types of beer. However, eating and drinking will probably be more enjoyable in more low-key establishments – the décor might be simpler, yet it will be more authentic, and the beer thicker and the meat fresher.

Of the national dishes, we recommend you try goulash soup served in a small loaf of bread (you can find it in U Kamenného Mostu and many other places). Also, make sure to try some paprika sausage and wash it down with the classic Becherovka – a liqueur made of thermal Karlovy Vary water and a dozen different herbs.

Street musicians (Buskers) on the Charles Bridge in Prague, Czech Republic
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Street musicians (Buskers) on the Charles Bridge in Prague, Czech Republic

If you want to bring back some presents, here’s what we recommend: wealthy collectors should definitely check out the Moser shops – even though a vase or milk jug can cost around a hundred US dollars here, they are all made of exceptional-quality crystal or porcelain. For the more romantically-inclined, we suggest the unique Czech marionettes – although not the ones sold in markets for 10 bucks, but the ones you can find in the small shops specialising in the wooden puppets.

Town Square in Prague
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Town Square in Prague

The Golden Lane (entrance to which is no longer free), located at Prague Castle, has many souvenir shops, although the things sold there cost more than the same stuff elsewhere. It is this little street that the brilliant Franz Kafka chose as his place of residence. The famous adornment of Prague – the Gothic St. Vitus Cathedral – is located just a dozen steps away from Kafka’s house.

According to locals, the things worth buying in Prague are as follows: footwear that’s made in the middle part of the country and South Moravia, smoked meat, Becherovka, classical music records, porcelain, crystal and cosmetics. All of these things are of excellent quality, yet don’t strain the bank account too much.

What to see

Where to stay

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