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About city What to see Gallery Where to stay

If you ask a Dubliner about life, you’re likely to hear the great Yates quote: “Everything changed, completely changed.” Once you arrive in this 2000-year-old city, you’re bound to get your own personal glimpse into how rapidly and decidedly this Viking city became a dynamic and modern Western European city. The capital of Ireland is frequently visited not just by emigrants, but also by tourists.

Dublin is the cultural, administrative and business centre of Ireland. It’s also home to the largest port in the country, which opens up on the Irish Sea. The name of the city comes from the Irish Doubh-linn, meaning “the black pond” or “bulrush-covered town”, which is far from adequate at describing the significantly brighter face of modern Dublin.

A panoramic view of Dublin at night
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  A panoramic view of Dublin at night

This city, glittering with hundreds of hues and colours, gave birth to one of the most famous rock bands in the world – U2. A third of Ireland’s population – about 1.2 million people – live in Dublin and its suburbs. Locals say that it’s a young man’s city, which cannot be said about most other European cities. Eating in diners will set you back around 6 Euros; buying food in shops will cost about 3-4 Euros; and dining in cafés and restaurants will be much more expensive than either.

In just a few decades Ireland saw such an extraordinary upsurge in economic growth that some began calling it the Celtic Tiger. This had a huge impact in Dublin and the whole of Ireland, which changed so fast and so utterly as to be almost unrecognisable by the year 2000.

A fire eater performs during a street festival in Dublin
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  A fire eater performs during a street festival in Dublin

Dublin was officially founded in 988 and its first inhabitants were Vikings. Irish people were forced to take up arms to defend their city many times – in the 9th century Dublin was conquered by the Danish, to be chased out by the English in 1171, who took up residence here. Dublin was constantly growing and by the 18th century became the largest city in the country.

Apart from some ruins and archaeological findings, Viking heritage here is scarce. Dublin was a fairly boring and old-fashioned placed for a long time, but since the Celtic Tiger Effect it has become energetic and trendy. Now it’s full of night clubs, cosy cafés, expensive restaurants and famous shops. Luxurious shopping centres, prestigious hotels, galleries and niche movie theatres can be found on almost any street in Dublin. But don’t forget the old architecture - churches, traditional breweries and pubs that co-exist in harmony with modern buildings and places of entertainment.

If you like holiday celebrations, we recommend you come to Dublin mid-March, when Saint Patrick’s Day is in full swing - come and witness the exquisite parade and see how the streets become imbued with green, white and orange.

Saint Patrick's Day, Dublin
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Saint Patrick's Day, Dublin

Dublin has a temperate sea climate with summer temperatures fluctuating between 10 and 20 degrees and dropping to several degrees below zero or remaining as high as 10 degrees above. Even though the Golf Stream makes the climate softer, cold Arctic wind make sure you don’t relax completely. The locals joke that their country is all climate and no weather.

The River Liffey divides Dublin into two parts, which became the main zones of the modestly-sized city centre that can be easily navigated on foot. In the southern part of the city you will find the most popular touristy objects, such as the Trinity College, the Christ Church and St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin Castle, a Guinness Brewery, city parks and the Dublin Cemetery. A tour of the brewery will cost you over 14 euros (or less if you order online), while the entrance fee into the Dublin Castle will set you back only €4.50. You can also visit the Irish National Museum for free or go see the Botanical Gardens, located 3 kilometres outside the city centre.

Where to stay

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