Need hotel?
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Place of stay
Check in
Check out
Guests and rooms
Number of rooms
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Recommended hotels
Thon Hotel Bergen Brygge
Thon Hotel Bergen Brygge
TripAdvisor rating Based on 94 reviews
View more
Augustin Hotel
Augustin Hotel
TripAdvisor rating Based on 731 reviews
View more
Grand Terminus
Grand Terminus
TripAdvisor rating Based on 920 reviews
View more
Thon Bristol Bergen
Thon Bristol Bergen
TripAdvisor rating Based on 663 reviews
View more
First Hotel Marin
First Hotel Marin
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1292 reviews
View more
More hotels
About city Gallery Where to stay

Bergen is the starting point of all the routes to Norway’s natural wonders. It’s called the Gateway to the Fjords of Norway, beause it marks the beginning of the Norwegian fjord region.

Most travellers usually stay in Bergen significantly longer than they do in other Norwegian cities. The reason for this is not just the city’s countless noteworthy objects, but also its unique atmosphere, colourful wooden houses and cobble streets.

Bergen
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Bergen

The climate here is humid – people say that Bergen has only about four rainless days per year. The high availability of many different rain-related souvenirs, such as canned rainwater from Bergen’s streets, ponchos and umbrellas, seems to lend this claim some weight. Regardless of the rain, though, Bergen leaves an excellent impression. On one side, it’s surrounded by the sea, and on the other by high hills that can be scaled by a funicular. The ascent takes eight minutes, and once on the top, you’ll see a breathtaking view of the city and of the North Sea.

Bergen, founded between 1066 and 1093, is the second-largest Norwegian city. In the 13th century, this Viking haven was designated the Norwegian Kingdom’s capital, which it remained until the 20th century. Furthermore, it used to belong to the Hanseatic League which gave Bergen’s most famous site, the Hanseatic Wharf, its name. This wharf is now protected by UNESCO as one of the most important monuments of medieval architecture.

Bergen Harbour
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Bergen Harbour

Now its buildings are home to various souvenir stores and workshops, for example, here you’ll find some spectacular little shops with shelves full of Norwegian trolls. One of the wharf’s houses has a two-storey Christmas toy shop that’s open even during the summer.

A little way along the wharf you’ll find the ancient Bergenhus Fortress and the Rosencratz Tower – a powerful 16th-century wooden structure. It’s the oldest building in the whole city.

Tourists should also visit the Fish Market, where you can get fresh crabs, shrimps, cod, salmon and other seafood, caught just a few hours before. Some of it is already fried, tempting standers-by with its delicious smell. The vendors are always happy to talk about their goods with tourists and offer them free samples. In Bergen, you can eat fish for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Apart from fish, we recommend you also try some venison steak – you won’t get it so tasty anywhere else.

Famous fish market in Bergen
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Famous fish market in Bergen

Bergen is justifiably proud of its Aquarium, giving one the opportunity to see one of Europe’s most beautiful and plentiful collections of marine fauna. Here you can see Royal Penguins pacing around proudly in their special quarters.

Of all the city’s churches, the Church of St. Mary, built early in the 12th century, is considered to be the most interesting. Its unique interior is exemplary of the Norwegian Baroque style. The church hosts many organ music concerts.

Bergen is a highly musical city. Every year it hosts all kinds of music festivals, probably the best-known of which is the one called Night Jazz. Bergen’s Museum of Art has one of the largest collections of Edvard Munch paintings and North Europe’s most famous Paul Klee collections. Bergen is also the city of the Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg, who lived in the Troldhaugen Home in Bergen’s suburbs for 22 years. Later the building was turned into a museum dedicated to his life and work.

Norway is by no means a cheap country. If you want so save money, you should buy the Bergen Card – a discount card that allows you to use public transportation and visit most museums for free, and gives discounts in restaurants, cafés and parking lots.

Where to stay

loading...