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About city Gallery Where to stay

Birmingham – the second-largest city in the United Kingdom – is one the country’s most important economic centres, which developed during the Industrial Revolution. It’s a large city that has slowly expanded into the many suburbs, lauded for its abundance in shopping centres, affordable prices and multicultural environment. It is also famous for its channels, so don’t miss your opportunity to see the city while sailing on a boat.

Having been a part of Warwickshire for a long time, Birmingham eventually swallowed up many of the surrounding cities and other settlements in 19-20th centuries thanks to the rapid growth it experienced due to the Industrial Revolution. Later, however, it was devastated by the bombings that took place during the Second World War, towards the end of which it was almost completely burned down and destroyed. After the war, the city was rebuilt and adapted for comfortable living. Due to increasing flows of immigration it also expanded outwards.

Birmingham
Photo taken by pixabay.  Birmingham

Even though Birmingham developed as a centre of industry and engineering, now its economy is dominated by the services sector and tourism. A night at the city’s cheapest guesthouses is around 15 Euros. Hotels are much more expensive, though.

The city has lots of museums, parks and churches, two cathedrals, a synagogue, several other religious temples, night clubs, restaurants, and bars. If you’ve come for just a couple of days, we’d advise you take a tour bus – there are many of those here. That way you can hear many fascinating stories and facts about individual objects of interest and the city as a whole. Those who like to party all night in clubs should go to Birmingham’s Broad Street where most of the city’s dance floors are located.

Many tourists advise future travellers to visit the city's Back to Backs district which displays the British way of life in 1840-1970. Here you’ll find traditional houses, various utensils and a well-rendered atmosphere of times past. It’s a rare opportunity to see how British people lived at that time.

Birmingham - Highgate Park
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Birmingham - Highgate Park

Given that Birmingham was established way back in the 6th century CE, it has many ancient buildings of different architectural styles, most of which are located at the very centre. On the way you’ll find plenty of cafés and little parks for short rest stops, and Birmingham’s Sutton Park is one of Europe’s largest city parks.

One of the city’s most prominent cultural attractions is the Birmingham Museum of Art, which has a large collection of famous paintings. Birmingham also has an interesting museum in the Jewellery Quarter, a science museum for children where they can experiment with natural forces, and a chocolate museum for those with a sweet tooth.

Birmingham
Photo taken by Mikey | Flickr.  Birmingham

Located 20 kilometres from Birmingham is one of the UK’s most popular theme parks – the Drayton Manor. Here you’ll find many different attractions, restaurants, a zoo, and a hotel. On arrival, a ticket for an adult is around 35 EUR, but significantly less if you buy online in advance.

Where to stay

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