Need hotel?
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Place of stay
Check in
Check out
Guests and rooms
Number of rooms
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Recommended hotels
Four Seasons Gresham Palace
Four Seasons Gresham Palace
TripAdvisor rating Based on 2424 reviews
View more
Palazzo Zichy
Palazzo Zichy
TripAdvisor rating Based on 4821 reviews
View more
Boutique Hotel Victoria Budapest
Boutique Hotel Victoria Budapest
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1433 reviews
View more
Residence Baron
Residence Baron
TripAdvisor rating Based on 697 reviews
View more
Hilton Budapest
Hilton Budapest
TripAdvisor rating Based on 4238 reviews
View more
More hotels
About city What to see Gallery Where to stay

Peculiar, leisurely, friendly, multicultural, colossal (yet cosy), green, comfortable, classical and modern, romantic and carefree – these are just a few of the epithets that could be used to describe one of the largest Central European cities – the Hungarian capital Budapest.

Budapest is a true metropolis of Central Europe – it’s just as large as cities like Prague and Vienna, and even though they’re all similar in many ways (they all used to be part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire), Budapest has a few tricks up its sleeve.

Let’s start with the fact that with Budapest you get two cities for the price of one – up until 1872, Buda and Pest were separate. Their differences are evident to this day – the hilly Buda is less hectic, greener and more conducive to long walks and tours, while the flat Pest is more proletarian, colourful and noisy.

Vaci Street in Budapest
Photo taken by 123rf,cim.  Vaci Street in Budapest

The city’s metro system is the oldest of its kind in continental Europe and second oldest in the world - the yellow M1 line, built in 1896, is now protected by UNESCO. Since public transportation is well-developed here, getting around the city shouldn't cause too many problems. Cycling enthusiasts can try out the green city bikes, proudly called BuBi.

Make sure you visit the Central Market, operating inside its red brick pavilion – it’s a true kingdom of different tastes and smells.  Here you can buy not only fresh fruits and vegetables, but also some excellent Hungarian wine and pepper-spiced sausages.

Great Market Hall in Budapest
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Great Market Hall in Budapest

For lovers of earthly pleasures, Budapest has to offer much more than just great food and drink – this city is also famous for its thermal baths, popularised by the Turks, who used to reign here. The architectural complexes of the Gellért and Széchenyi baths are true Art Nouveau masterpieces, which should be seen by everybody, regardless of their predilection for baths.

The Neo-Gothic Parliament Palace and the Buda Castle, situated on different sides of the Danube, are just two examples of Budapest’s architectural 'celebrities' - the exquisite Gothic-style Matthias Church, the Hungarian State Opera, the St. Stephen’s Basilica and the Moor-style Dohány Street Synagogue, where Franz Liszt played during its opening ceremony, should also make your list of places to visit.

Outdoor swimming pools and baths in The Szechenyi spa complex
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Outdoor swimming pools and baths in The Szechenyi spa complex

If you ever find yourself overwhelmed and wanting to spend an afternoon quietly, we recommend you go to one of Budapest’s parks. The largest of the latter is the City Park, located just behind the Heroes’ Square – another Hungarian jem. One more park can be found on Margaret Island in the middle of the Danube. Here you can watch passing ships, marvel at the miniature Japanese garden or see the UNESCO-protected Musical Fountains and the Margaret Island Water Tower. This island has much more than could be guessed at first sight – in the summer, it hosts one of the largest festivals in Central and Eastern Europe – the Sziget Festival, or 'Island' Festival.

Where to stay

loading...