Need hotel?
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Place of stay
Check in
Check out
Guests and rooms
Number of rooms
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Recommended hotels
Mamilla Hotel Jerusalem
Mamilla Hotel Jerusalem
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1556 reviews
View more
Leonardo Jerusalem
Leonardo Jerusalem
TripAdvisor rating Based on 2141 reviews
View more
Arthur Hotel - an Atlas Boutique Hotel
Arthur Hotel - an Atlas Boutique Hotel
BOUTIQUE
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1247 reviews
View more
The Inbal Hotel Jerusalem
The Inbal Hotel Jerusalem
SPECIAL CATEGORY
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1802 reviews
View more
Caesar Premier Jerusalem
Caesar Premier Jerusalem
TripAdvisor rating Based on 709 reviews
View more
More hotels
About city What to see Gallery Where to stay

If there is only one city in the world whose name is spoken with excitement by people of different nations, creeds and races, it is Jerusalem, one of the most mysterious places on the planet. This 5,000 year-old city charms and enchants. Spending time here makes one lose all sense of reality, as Jerusalem integrates the present with eternity.

The city, placed at the centre of the world by ancient maps, is still a common sanctuary to Christians, Jews and Muslims. Jerusalem is called the “seat of peace”, and the city of three religions. You’d be hard-pressed to find such a blend of historical monuments, traditions and cultures anywhere else in the world. As if by the hand of a brilliant painter, the city integrates the most unlikely of details: boys wearing payot, men dressed in black rushing to the synagogue, Arabs beckoning you to buy something, soldiers with machine guns on their shoulders, tourists and pilgrims from all over the globe, the sound of church bells, and the voice of a muezzin calling the faithful for a prayer.

Panorama of Jerusalem Old City
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Panorama of Jerusalem Old City

Every site in the city has its own history, so you’ll need several days even just to get acquainted with the objects in the old, historical part. The Old Town of today’s Jerusalem is divided into four neighbourhoods: Muslim, Christian, Armenian and Jewish.

The Muslim neighbourhood is the largest of the four, and home to the Arab community. Here you’ll find the holiest of Muslim sites – the Al-Aqsa and Dome of the Rock mosques, no less important than the Quaboos Mosque in Mecca. The neighbourhood is also home to the Via Doloresa – the Way of the Cross, taken by the Christ to Golgotha. The streets here brim with small shops and kiosks for tourists. The sellers beckon them in every language in the world, the narrowness of the streets makes for frequent tourist and pilgrim jams, and the air is full of intoxicating spice aromas.

The building of the Christian neighbourhood began in the 4th century AD. It has around 40 churches, monasteries and lots of accommodation for pilgrims. At the very centre of the neighbourhood you’ll see the most important of Christian temples – the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, built at the site where Jesus was crucified, buried, and resurrected. The church is used by six Christian confessions: the Greek Orthodox, Roman Catholic, Syriac Christian, Coptic, Ethiopian, and Armenian Apostolic churches. Each confession comes to pray at a pre-determined time.

Walled old town of Jerusalem Israel
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Walled old town of Jerusalem Israel

The Armenian neighbourhood is the smallest neighbourhood in the Old Town. It’s also one of the most isolated, as the Armenian community lives its own life, which it doesn’t really want to make public, speaks its own language, and send its children to national schools to learn Armenian. The most important thing to do here is to visit the 13th-century Cathedral of St. James, dedicated to one of the thirteen apostles. People of the Armenian diaspora mostly occupy themselves with creative professions, such as painting, photography and craftsmanship. Armenian pottery deserves a special mention thanks to its quality.

The Jewish neighbourhood is home to the Wailing Wall. Basically, it’s a small segment of Temple Mount’s retaining wall. Every day, the wall is visited by many tourists and locals who come here to pray. Most of them also bring sheets of paper inscribed with their appeals to God, which they stick into the gaps between rocks.

People praying in front of the Wailing Wall, Jerusalem
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  People praying in front of the Wailing Wall, Jerusalem

In the Jewish neighbourhood, archaeologists have found a stretch of an ancient Roman street, paved during the times of the Emperor Hadrian. At that time, it was the main commercial street. Walking down its Roman cobbles and looking at all the 2,000-year-old pillars, one can feel as the contemporary of this great Roman emperor.

During the period between April and October, Jerusalem is almost as hot as in the summer, while the stretch between November and March is characterised by colder weather and lots of rain. The most comfortable clothes to wear in Jerusalem are casual and sporty. The locals wear jeans and t-shirts even to restaurants. If you plan to visit some holy places, however, make sure to wear clothing that covers your shoulders and knees. Friday evening to Saturday evening, public transportation, except taxi services, grind to a near halt; most commercial establishments are closed during this time, too.

In many places where people gather (such in as shopping centres, restaurants, banks, movie theatres and state agencies) people are often asked to open their bags for random checks – this is done to ensure safety.

What to see

Where to stay

loading...