Need hotel?
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Place of stay
Check in
Check out
Guests and rooms
Number of rooms
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Recommended hotels
Continent Cron Palace Hotel Tbilisi
Continent Cron Palace Hotel Tbilisi
TripAdvisor rating Based on 153 reviews
View more
Riverside Hotel
Riverside Hotel
TripAdvisor rating Based on 304 reviews
View more
Radisson Blu Iveria
Radisson Blu Iveria
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1069 reviews
View more
Tbilisi Marriott Hotel
Tbilisi Marriott Hotel
TripAdvisor rating Based on 489 reviews
View more
Betsy's Hotel
Betsy's Hotel
TripAdvisor rating Based on 350 reviews
View more
More hotels
About city Gallery Where to stay

Tbilisi is a love-it-or-hate-it kind of city:  good wine costs as little as one euro here; health-promoting sulphur water rushes from underneath the ground; people are hospitable; signs are unreadable; and taxis have no meters. Architecture in Tbilisi varies from Ottoman Empire-style window shutters, narrow streets and embossed balconies to futuristic glass and tin buildings that resemble giant mushrooms and insects.

On the other hand, there’s also a lot of garbage, ruins, grey, Soviet-style apartment buildings, homelessness and poverty. This city has many sides and no middle – the beautiful Kura River and majestic Georgia Mountains on one side and shabby vagabonds, clotheslines outside windows and holes in apartment buildings on the other. Despite all that, however, tourists can feel safe here – the streets are lit, and crime rates among the lowest in Europe.

Beautiful panoramic view of Tbilisi
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Beautiful panoramic view of Tbilisi

Georgian culture has formed for more than 3,000 years since the early Gerogian state of Diauehii was established. Tbilisi was built by King Vakhtang I Gorgasali in the 5th century. Since the Georgian people had to suffer many wars and occupations, the influence that foreign cultures had here can be clearly seen on the façades of buildings.

The reasons why tourists love Tbilisi, however, have little to do with buildings, and everything to do with its spirit, tasty wine, straightforward and friendly people, and their ability to celebrate life.

One of the most popular tourist attractions here is the Narikala Fortress, looming over Tbilisi on a steep hill. The Church of St. Michael was recently restored in one of its courtyards. The Anchiskhati Church is Tbilisi’s oldest Orthodox church still in operation, and the Sioni Cathedral and the Metekhi Church are two other beautiful sanctuaries of the city.

Sulphur baths in Tbilisi
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Sulphur baths in Tbilisi

If you want to experience the real Tbilisi, we suggest you visit the sulphur baths with their hot, healthful mineral water that comes from under the Georgian ground.

In Tbilisi, authentic local food is easy to find. Make sure you try some cheese-filled mushrooms, traditionally made in a clay pot, nut-filled eggplant, khachapuri (sometimes called the Georgian pizza) and the true Georgian kebab shashlik or some butter-stewed chicken.

Traditional Georgian shashlik
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Traditional Georgian shashlik

Just don’t forget that Tbilisi is an Eastern city, which means that people will try to fleece you every step of the way. Make sure to count your change, examine bills and haggle in markets and taxis – you’ll be surprised at what a difference it makes.

Georgia’s traditional dances are appreciated for their fluidity and energetic spirit. You can see these wonderful performances in Tbilisi’s Opera and Ballet Theatre, the Georgia Philharmonic, Georgian Folk Theatre Nabadi, and also in many restaurants.

Young Wine Festival in Tbilisi
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Young Wine Festival in Tbilisi

Tbilisi is a multicultural city with around 1.5 million people from over a 100 different countries. Apart from ethnic Georgians, who comprise around 80 per cent of the population, Tbilisi also has large Armenian and Azerbaijani communities, and smaller groups of Russians, Abkhazians, Ossetians, Ukrainians, Greeks, Jews, Estonians, Germans, Kurds and Lithuanians.

Georgia is a highly religious country, and throughout its history, Tbilisi has always been known for its religious tolerance, which is especially evident in the Old Town, where one can see churches, mosques and synagogues standing side by side.

Beautiful panoramic view of Tbilisi at sunset
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Beautiful panoramic view of Tbilisi at sunset

The climate of Georgia is warm and pleasant – the Caucasus Mountains do a great job of guarding the country from cold northern winds. Winters here are short and soft, but summers – long and very hot, so if you don’t do well in high temperatures, stay away from Tbilisi during the period between July and August.

Every summer, Tbilisi hosts the massively popular folk music and dance festival ArtGeni, the final concerts of which fill the Open Air Museum of Ethnography. During the festival, one can enjoy the music of ensembles from all around Georgia.

Where to stay

loading...