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About city Gallery Where to stay

Turin, the birthplace of the hazelnut chocolate spread Nutella, is a city located in the northwest of Italy. It’s the capital of the Turin Province and the Pidemont Region, situated at the confluence of rivers Po and Dora Riparia. It is a large centre of culture and industry. Having successfully flourished for almost three thousand years, this northern Italian city attracts thousands of Christian pilgrims, who come here to see the famous Shroud of Turin.

Turin’s symbol Mole Antonelliana – initially a synagogue and now a lightning-conductor – is the highest building in the city at almost 170 m, and a competitor of the Eiffel Tower. Now it hosts the National Cinema Museum with a glass lift at its centre, which takes visitors to the overview that opens up on a fantastic panorama of the entire city.

Mole Antonelliana-Turin
Photo taken by shutterstock.  Mole Antonelliana-Turin

In total, Turin has over 40 museums. Among the most popular of these is the Egyptian Museum, the second-richest and -most important of its kind after the one in Cairo. Here you’ll also find the Royal Armoury (Armeria Reale) and a gun museum; the Palazzo Madama palace, which hosts the Turin City Museum of Ancient Art; the Carignano Palace (Palazzo Carignano), a science academy and the University of Turin – the city is a true intellectual centre. Most of the famous buildings were built in the 17-18th centuries (except the Giovanni Battista Cathedral, which came about in the 15th century).

Piazza San Carlo is one of the main city squares in Turin
Photo taken by N i c o l a | Flickr.  Piazza San Carlo is one of the main city squares in Turin

Every year, the faithful travel to the mysterious Italian city of Turin, where a very special shroud is kept –a shroud that presented the world with a baffling puzzle. One of the most mysterious European relics can be seen at the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist. On display for the visitors is a copy that’s one third the size of the original.

And even though Christians believe that the dead body of Jesus was wrapped in the Shroud of Turin, scientists estimate it was actually made in 1260-1390. In total, there were roughly 40 of these shrouds, and they were used to trick people. Researchers claim that the shroud with the image of Jesus’ body on it is a counterfeit. According to them, the shroud was actually wrapped around a lowly student whose body was covered in ochre. The shroud was then dried in an oven and washed, making it seem old. All of that notwithstanding, the faithful have no doubt about the shroud’s authenticity, and consider it to be a symbol of the suffering their Saviour was subject to.

By the way, according to urban legend, the chalice that Jesus drank from during the Last Supper, known as the Holy Grail, is also located in Turin, somewhere in the Church of the Great Mother of God, or its immediate surroundings. No one, however, has been able to find it to this day.

Turin is also known for its two football clubs – FC Juventus (established in 1879) and FC Torino (established in 1906). The former is one of the most successful clubs not only in Italy, but also the entire world. Watching a football match in one of Turin’s many bars could become a fun travel adventure.

Naked bike tour in Turin
Photo taken by Joao Trindade | Flickr.  Naked bike tour in Turin

Travellers should keep in mind that in Turin the week begins on Tuesday – from then on, early morning to late evening, every public establishment, museum, restaurant, shopping centre and beauty salon is at your service. For the locals, Mondays are kind of like an extended weekend, when people flood the bars and restaurants, and only in the afternoons do some shopping when grocery stores open.

If you want to take a look around a local shopping centre, be prepared to leave the city limits, as all grocery stores and larger shopping centres are located at the city boundries.

Where to stay

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