Need hotel?
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Place of stay
Check in
Check out
Guests and rooms
Number of rooms
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Recommended hotels
Fabric Hotel
Fabric Hotel
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1213 reviews
View more
Le Pierre
Le Pierre
TripAdvisor rating Based on 159 reviews
View more
Paris Liege Hotel
Paris Liege Hotel
TripAdvisor rating Based on 146 reviews
View more
Le 123 Sebastopol Astotel
Le 123 Sebastopol Astotel
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1732 reviews
View more
Littre
Littre
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1231 reviews
View more

Top 11 Facts about Paris

A couple dancing in a street of Montmartre, Paris
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  A couple dancing in a street of Montmartre, Paris

Occupied several times, but never broken in spirit; celebrating freedom and worshiping entertainment, Paris has been a major attraction for travellers from around the world for a very long time. And, sometimes, certain facts about Paris can seem downright unbelievable.

  • Quite a few times, visitors of Paris, especially Japanese tourists, have been diagnosed with Paris Syndrome – a mental disorder that manifests itself in dizziness, hallucinations and a number of other symptoms. The syndrome is often caused by a strong sense of discrepancy between the accounts of Paris presented in Japanese media, and reality. The effect is also reinforced by the differences between the French and Japanese cultures.
Arch of Triumph
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Arch of Triumph
  • In all of continental Europe, including Paris, traffic moves on the right side of the road. There is, however, a very short street here, called Rue du Lemmonier, where cars drive on the left.
  • In 1793, a certain superintendent of a Parisian military hospital got lost in the city’s catacombs. The reason he went there was a hidden stash of liqueur. The unfortunate’s body was only found 11 years later. “How is this possible”, you ask? These underground corridors stretch for as long as 300 km.
  • In Paris, foreigners are surprised by the transparent plastic garbage cans. While they certainly don’t make the city look any better, they became a necessity due to the incessant risk of terrorist attacks.
Snails cooked in a special recipe. Paris. France
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Snails cooked in a special recipe. Paris. France
  • For 30 years now, American-born Jim Haynes has been inviting complete strangers into his home. To have lunch with this extraordinary man, all you have to do is send a message via the Internet.
  • At the beginning of the 20th century, Paris had a “people zoo”, officially called Exposition Coloniale, or the Paris Colonial Exposition. This zoo became home to people who were brought here by the French from their colonies (Madagascar, India, China, Sudan, Congo, Tunisia and Morocco). It was frequented by millions of people. Meanwhile, the “exhibits” from warm lands suffered from cold weather and humiliation. Today, the erstwhile zoo is considered, with good reason, to be the country’s national shame.
Įdomiausi faktai apie Prancūziją
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Įdomiausi faktai apie Prancūziją
  • Interesting facts related to the Eiffel Tower abound. Hitler, who came to visit Paris during the Second World War, was never able to get to the top as the locals broke the lift on purpose. This is the source of the popular saying “Hitler conquered France, but never conquered the Eiffel Tower”. By the way, shortly before Paris was liberated, Hitler gave the order to level it, but the German general in charge of the operation loved the city so much he decided to ignore it.
  • Many people have tried to commit suicide by jumping off the Eiffel Tower. An interesting case was a woman who jumped and landed on the hood of a car. Later she married its owner.
  • There are 600 employees at the Eiffel Tower. Two tons of paper are used up to print all the tickets to it every year. Every seven years, the tower is repainted, which requires 60 tonnes of paint, an operation costing 4 million EUR.
  • The city’s shortest street – the Rue des Degres – is a mere six metres long.
  • The writer Victor Hugo spent the last years of his life living on an avenue that was named after him while he was still alive. The return address the writer usually designated as: “For Messier Victor Hugo in his avenue in Paris”.

Write comment