Need hotel?
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Place of stay
Check in
Check out
Guests and rooms
Number of rooms
  • Room #1
    Adults
    Children
    Child's age
Recommended hotels
71 Nyhavn Hotel
71 Nyhavn Hotel
TripAdvisor rating Based on 336 reviews
View more
Skt Petri
Skt Petri
TripAdvisor rating Based on 309 reviews
View more
Copenhagen Island
Copenhagen Island
TripAdvisor rating Based on 2291 reviews
View more
Comfort Hotel Vesterbro
Comfort Hotel Vesterbro
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1273 reviews
View more
Ibsens
Ibsens
TripAdvisor rating Based on 1111 reviews
View more

10 Ways to Have a Good Time in Copenhagen

Nyhavn district is one of the most famous landmark in Copenhagen
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Nyhavn district is one of the most famous landmark in Copenhagen

Most people associate the word “Copenhagen” with streets full of bicycles, the statue of the Little Mermaid and the bohemian heaven Christiania. But the flat capital of Denmark has much more to offer than that. According to studies, Copenhagen is home to some of the world’s happiest people. Here are 10 tips for those planning to visit Copenhagen.

1. Choose apps, not maps!

Since the Tourist Board of Copenhagen is open only a few hours a day, make sure to get your maps at the airport or simply download a couple of handy apps to your smart phone. Due to the fact that, when it comes to technology, Danish people like to be on the cutting edge, you can choose from a wide range of convenient apps made specially for city guests.

2. Where to get a bicycle

City Bike for free
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  City Bike for free

A bicycle is hands down the most convenient means of transportation in the city, but tourists are often puzzled as to how and where to get one cheap. To this end, a small group of urban enthusiasts have created a voluntary organization called Copenhagen Free Bike Rental, which rents bikes to tourists for a voluntary donation. It’s worth knowing that during the night cyclists must ride with both front and rear lights on. Failure to comply with this rule may incur a fine.

3. Sit down and relax in one of Copenhagen’s green park

Danish people go to parks to get a tan (since there are much fewer sunny days here than in the South, the locals eat up every ray they get), meet friends, read books or drink beer with their peers.

If you come here during the summer, don’t miss the opportunity to visit Kongens Have – the oldest and arguably the cosiest park at the centre of Copenhagen, where in the midst of rose gardens, surrounded by sculptures, calming meadows and a moat, you’ll find the Royal Palace. Here you can enjoy the bustling atmosphere of the capital and the stillness of a park both at the same time.

Kongens Have park
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Kongens Have park

If you find yourself at Nørrebro, known as the melting pot of Copenhagen’s ethnic communities, make sure to pay a visit to the Assistens Kirkegård cemetery, enclosed by a yellow brick fence, where you’ll find the most extraordinary flora and the rarest species of trees and shrubs. Surrounded by the green foliage here lie the most well-known Danish luminaries, one of whom is the national hero Hans Christian Andersen.

4. Don’t miss the National Museum of Denmark

Admission to the museum is free, and the display so colourful, that even those prepared will be impressed. The museum also has an exposition for children where they can try out a Viking ship and see a medieval kitchen. Meanwhile, the adults will be able to explore unique exhibits from the Stone Age, the Renaissance and modern times. The expositions are so realistic that one cannot help but feel like they are travelling back in time. Since opening hours in Denmark are among the shortest in the whole of Europe, make sure to learn them before coming.

The National Museum of Denmark located at Copenhagen
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  The National Museum of Denmark located at Copenhagen

5. The city as seen from above

If you decide to visit Christiania, just next to it you’ll find the Church of Our Saviour (Vor Frelsers Kirke), which has a tall, screw-shaped roof perfect for getting a bird’s-eye view of the city.

Girl enjoying view of Copenhagen from top of Vor Frelsers Kirke
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Girl enjoying view of Copenhagen from top of Vor Frelsers Kirke

Another exquisite panorama can be seen from the Danish parliament building in the central square, which has the tallest tower in the city. Entrance is free, and if you climb to the very top, you’ll find a restaurant there. Again, just don’t forget to check the opening hours, as they’re relatively short.

6. Even though the prices in bars and cafés are steep, supermarkets sell food almost as cheap as their counterparts in Eastern Europe. Just remember that supermarkets here are not all the same: Fakta, Netto and Aldi are cheaper, while Super Brugsen and Føtex are more expensive, but still worth a visit if you want fresh fruit and organic products.

7. Night life

If you long for something different, swing by the Meatpacking Distric, situated in the Versterbro neighbourhood. It’s a small, hipster-beloved district of night clubs and bars, mostly located in lofts, which used to house meat processing plants. Now it’s one of the city’s night life centres, full of bars and clubs, most famous of which are Jolene and Bakken. Since the atmosphere outside is that of an industrial district, just ignore the apparently grim façades and dive among people until you find a bar to your liking.

Nyhavn harbour by Night
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Nyhavn harbour by Night

By the way, in Denmark you can drink alcohol wherever you like. So don’t allow laziness to come over you and prevent you from tasting beer made in authentic breweries, which is so much better than the most popular brands.

8. If you’re after local food, visit the in-door city market (Torvehallerne), which is somewhat similar to those found in Spain or Italy, but since this is Scandinavia, everything is much more organized and well looked after. Here you’ll find fresh fish, famous muffins from the Agnes Bakery, Bornholm rhubarb juice, different types of traditionally prepared meat and everything else your heart desires. Even though the traditional Danish cuisine is dominated by meat and potatoes, people also love fresh vegetables, which they prefer to eat raw.

Workers prepare meats in the Torvehallerne market
Photo taken by 123rf.com.  Workers prepare meats in the Torvehallerne market

9. Heaven for those who like to make experiments is the description of Experimentarium – a centre of science where you can touch and try various scientific inventions. The expositions here are divided into three distinct groups: inventions, winter sports (20 of which are available) and various games and puzzles. Even though it’s meant mostly for kids, adults are sure to find it no less exciting.

10. Get out of the city

Visit the Frederiksborg Castle, situated in Hillerød, about 40 minutes by train from the city centre. It’s the largest Renaissance castle in Scandinavia, built on top of three islands, and boasting an enormous park and several fountains. You’ll have to set aside half a day if you want to see the whole park, though.

Another half a day will be required of art lovers who set out to the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art (situated about 35 minutes from the city centre by train), where the most famous creators of modern art join together concepts of art, architecture and landscape.

Write comment